De-identification of psychiatric intake records: Overview of 2016 CEGS N-GRID shared tasks Track 1

Citation:

Amber Stubbs, Michele Filannino, and Özlem Uzuner. 2017. “De-identification of psychiatric intake records: Overview of 2016 CEGS N-GRID shared tasks Track 1.” J Biomed Inform, 75S, Pp. S4-S18.
De-identification of psychiatric intake records: Overview of 2016 CEGS N-GRID shared tasks Track 1

Abstract:

The 2016 CEGS N-GRID shared tasks for clinical records contained three tracks. Track 1 focused on de-identification of a new corpus of 1000 psychiatric intake records. This track tackled de-identification in two sub-tracks: Track 1.A was a "sight unseen" task, where nine teams ran existing de-identification systems, without any modifications or training, on 600 new records in order to gauge how well systems generalize to new data. The best-performing system for this track scored an F1 of 0.799. Track 1.B was a traditional Natural Language Processing (NLP) shared task on de-identification, where 15 teams had two months to train their systems on the new data, then test it on an unannotated test set. The best-performing system from this track scored an F1 of 0.914. The scores for Track 1.A show that unmodified existing systems do not generalize well to new data without the benefit of training data. The scores for Track 1.B are slightly lower than the 2014 de-identification shared task (which was almost identical to 2016 Track 1.B), indicating that these new psychiatric records pose a more difficult challenge to NLP systems. Overall, de-identification is still not a solved problem, though it is important to the future of clinical NLP.
Last updated on 04/27/2018